Why we DO NOT SELL Ventless Products

What to look out for

The dangers of using ventless gas heaters are MANY and VERY controversial. Some of these dangers include asphyxiation, as the air inside of a well sealed house is depleted of oxygen, and carbon monoxide poisoning, as amounts of carbon monoxide can  build up over time in a well sealed house to levels that are dangerous and can be deadly. Although these dangers should be taken seriously, it should also be noted that open fireplaces emit even higher levels of these substances. Lastly, ventless gas heaters create water vapor as a part of their exhaust, which raises the humidity in a room or house and can result in mold or mildew growing on all the surfaces therein.

Some service providers say unvented fireplaces burn more efficiently than their vented gas-powered counterparts and cost less to install. Other providers and organizations contend that ventless fireplaces are unsafe or otherwise undesirable.

The National Association of Certified Home Inspectors warns that these fireplaces necessarily vent unburned combustion products — including carbon monoxide — directly into the living space.

At this writing, unvented gas stoves, gas logs and fireplaces have been outlawed altogether in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. In the US, it is illegal to install vent-frees anywhere in the States of California and Montana. Minnesota has a state-wide ban prohibiting installation of vent-frees in any home built after 1980. County-wide bans exist in several states, including Arizona, Colorado, Washington, Kansas, Wyoming, Ohio, Michigan, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nevada, New Mexico, Alaska, Minnesota, Texas and New Hampshire. Austin, Texas and New York City have outlawed vent-frees on a city-wide basis. Most areas that don’t ban vent-frees altogether prohibit their use as the sole source of heat in any dwelling.

Please see the helpful information below, when making your decision on any vent free product.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Unvented Gas Space Heating Appliances (AEN-204) by T.H. Greiner, Ph.D., P.E. – Extension Agricultural Engineer  – Iowa State University of Science and Technology

Letters From Unhappy Vent-Free Gas Fireplace Owners

CDC Reference(s)

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Nonfatal, unintentional, non–fire-related carbon monoxide exposures–United States, 2004-2006. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2008 Aug 22;57(33):896-9. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5733a2.htm
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Carbon monoxide–related deaths–United States,1999-2004. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007 Dec 21;56(50):1309-12. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5650a1.htm
  3. Hampson NB, Piantadosi CA, Thom SR, Weaver LK. Practice recommendations in the diagnosis, management, and prevention of carbon monoxide poisoning. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2012 Dec1;186(11):1095-101.
  4. Peterson JE, Stewart RD. Predicting the carboxyhemoglobin levels resulting from carbon monoxide exposures. J Appl Physiol. 1975 Oct;39(4):633-8. [The report on which this publication is based is available online as: Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Environmental Medicine. Predicting the carboxyhemoglobin levels resulting from carbon monoxide exposures. June 1973. EPA report 95OR73015 (see chart on page 33) https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPURL.cgi?Dockey=9100KXTI.TXT
  5. Belson MG, Schier JG, Patel MM; CDC. Case definitions for chemical poisoning. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2005 Jan 14;54(RR-1):1-24. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5401a1.htm